Sofirn SC31 Pro Andúril Flashlight Review

Sofirn dropped the SC31 Pro 18650 Andúril flashlight not long ago, and I finally got my hands on on.  It’s notable because it’s a very low cost Andúril light!  Read on for some thoughts and testing.


Official Specs and Features

Here’s a link to the official product page.

Versions

There’s just one body of the Sofirn SC31 Pro, but it’s available for purchase in two emitter temperatures:  6500K (seen here) and 5000K.

Price

Without a cell, this light clocks in at $28 (sale price).  Looks like it’s $31.99 right now on amazon (referral link).  The amazon price with cell is $40.


Short Review

I’d consider this one a good beater light.  Inexpensive, Andúril user interface, lighted switch.  It’s a good light, especially for the price.

Long Review

The Big Table

Sofirn SC31 Pro
Emitter: Luminus SST-40 (CW)
Price in USD at publication time: $31.99 on amazon (referral link)
Cell: 1×18650
Turbo Runtime High Runtime
LVP?
Switch Type: E-Switch
Quiescent Current (mA): Switch off: 0.05
Switch Low: 0.11
Switch High: 1.57
On-Board Charging? Yes
Charge Port Type: USB-C
Chargetime
Power off Charge Port With Cell: All modes
Without Cell: 6 stepped modes
Claimed Lumens (lm) 2000
Measured Lumens (at 30s) 1526 (76.3% of claim)*
Candela per Lumen 7.8
Claimed Throw (m) 200
Candela (Calculated) in cd (at 30s) 1000lux @ 3.624m = 13133cd
Throw (Calculated) (m) 229.2 (114.6% of claim)*
All my Sofirn reviews!
  • Measurement disclaimer:  I am an amateur flashlight reviewer.  I don’t have $10,000 or even $1,000 worth of testing equipment.  I test output and such in PVC tubes!!  Please consider claims within 10% of what I measure to be perfectly reasonable (accurate, even).

What’s Included

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight what's included

  • Sofirn SC31 Pro Flashlight
  • Sofirn 3000mAh 18650 (button top, standard)
  • Spare o-rings (2)
  • Lanyard
  • Charge cable (USB to USB-C)
  • Manual

Package and Manual

I couldn’t find the manual anywhere else, so here’s a pretty solid copy of all the English pages.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight manual 1

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight manual 2

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight manual 3

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight manual 4

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight manual 5

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight manual 6

Build Quality and Disassembly

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight feature photo

The build quality of the Sofirn SC31 Pro is commensurate with the price.  It’s around a $30 light – seems about right.  That’s for simply build quality though.  The actual guts of this light (discussed later) put it in a separate (and higher) category.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight emitter

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight tailcap

The head has minimal cooling fins, and overall retains the “tube light” nature.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight switch

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight switch profile

The body has ample knurling, and it’s sharpish.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight body knurling

Even the tailcap smartly has knurling too.  This makes it very easy to unscrew.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight tailcap knurling

More on this clip later.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight crooked clip

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight clip profile

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight with cell 18650

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight friction clip hug

The threads on this light are very smooth.  They’re square cut, sort of long, anodized, and again… very smooth.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight head removed showing threads

The head end has a nice thick spring.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight spring in head

The tail end also has a nice spring.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight spring in tail

And the cell tube removes fully too, so here’s a better shot of both springs.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight spring in tail

The cell tube is removable fully, and also reversible.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight cell tube

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight cell installed

I think this alignment of the switch LEDs is pretty normal… if you’re expecting them to be on… some… other axis, then this might not be the light for you.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight switch lit low

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight emitter on

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight headstanding

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight lanyard installed

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight lanyard installed

Not sure what ever else you thought about those square anodized threads above, but the first thing I thought was “hey that’s like a new S2+ threading!”  I have only one new S2+, and it’s a copper one.  And yes it threads on perfectly.  And also YES it works fully!  Sort of a bonus is that you now also have a mechanical tailswitch!  (You’ll ask so:  No it doesn’t really work the other way.  Yes it connects electrically BUT notice that you’ve taken out all the switches.  So no good way to modulate the modes.)

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight head on convoy s2+ body

Size and Comps

Dimension: 117.5 mm (length) x 25.4mm (head diameter)
Weight: 59±1 gram (without batteries)

If a light will headstand, I’ll show it here (usually the third photo).  If a light will tailstand, I’ll show that here, too (usually the fourth photo).

Here’s the test light with the venerable Convoy S2+.  Mine’s a custom “baked” edition Nichia 219b triple.  A very nice 18650 light.

And here’s the light beside my custom engraved TorchLAB BOSS 35, an 18350 light.  I reviewed the aluminum version of that light in both 35 and 70 format.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight beside torchlab boss 35

Retention and Carry

A pocket clip comes already attached.  It’s the lowest kind of pocket clip (and leads heavily to my opinion of the build quality).  It’s a friction fit clip, and mine is bent all crooked.  I could fix it but really, let’s just get it right the first time!  This is not the biggest deal, and doesn’t affect functionality.

As I said above, the clip only goes in one spot, but the cell tube is reversible, so the clip can end up on the head or tail end per your preference.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight cell tube off

A lanyard is also included, and attaches on the tailcap.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight lanyard installed

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight lanyard installed

The light will also headstand, and there are no “reliefs” to let light out when doing so.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight headstanding

With the reversible cell tube, the light can technically reasonably be used as a hat light.

There is also a magnet tail cap option, but my package did not include that.

Power and Runtime

The SC31 Pro operates on a single lithium ion cell.  I have a package that had a cell included.  It’s a 3000mAh button top, and is a completely standard cell.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight 3000mah 18650

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight 3000mah 18650

The cell goes into the light in the usual way – positive terminal toward the head.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight 3000mah 18650 installed

Here are a couple of runtimes.  As with most Andúril lights I test, I set the light to the stepped modes, and test the two highest modes.  First is Turbo (that is, double click when the light is on).  The light reaches around 1800 lumens, and steps down at ~30s pretty heavily.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight turbo runtime graph

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight high runtime graph

Interestingly the Highest of the stepped modes also steps down pretty heavily, again to around 200 lumens.  I don’t observe low voltage protection when testing with the bench power, but I’m assured Andúril has it!

EDIT:  Many people have reminded me that often Andúril needs to be calibrated to allow the light to function properly.  I don’t disagree, but I also think the light should function correctly out of the box.  If it doesn’t, then this isn’t a light suited to beginners, or people unwilling to calibrate.  Calibration isn’t hard, but it’s very specific.

So I calibrated the light.  Here’s the graphic that should help with temperature calibration.

Start with the light off.
Click 3x – this puts you in battery check.  Feel free to confirm this by waiting for the battery check output.
Click 2x – this puts you in Sunset.
Click 2x – this puts you in Beacon.  I pause here to confirm I’m in beacon.
Click 2x – this puts you in the Temp check mode.

At this point wait and see what the calibration is.  The light will blink a number of times (the tens number), then blink a number of times to reveal the ones number of the thermal setting – in degrees Celsius.  For example, when I checked temperature calibration, the light blinked 4x, then paused, then blinked 1x.  That’s right, the thermal calibration on my light was set to Forty One degrees Celsius.

What does that mean though?  It means that the light thinks my room temperature is 41°C.  That’s very far off – my room temperature is around 22°C.  It also means that there’s only a tiny window of operation, before the light hits the thermal ceiling as programmed (probably 50°C but I’m not sure).

This light definitely needs a thermal recalibration.  I set the room temperature to [accurate] – 22°C.  Then I set the temperature limit to around 55°C.  That means there’s a broad range of operation temperatures for the light to work – from room temp 22°C, all the way to 55°C.

Once you’re in temperature check (covered above), do the following:

Click 4x.  The light will blink 1x and then blink very quickly as an indicating it is willing to accept your input.  You can do nothing (aka “wait”) or click the number of times of degrees C of your room – 1 degree per click.  This means that while the light is blinking for my input, I clicked 22x.  Now the light knows that this temperature is 22°C.  Important!
Click 4x.  The light will blink 2x and then blink very quickly as an indicating it is willing to accept your input.  You can do nothing (aka “wait”) or click the number of times you wish for the thermal ceiling minus 30.  For example, if you wish to set the ceiling to 55°C (as I did), then you click 55-30, or 25x.  Now thermal calibration is complete.

After doing all this, I reran two output tests, which can be seen below.

The SC31 Pro also has built in charging, by way of a USB-C port in the head.  The charge port cover is thick and fits in very firmly, and is quite nice.

An appropriate cable is included.  USB to USB-C.

Charging is a respectable ~2A, and , and takes just over 2 hours.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight charge graph

Modes and Currents

Mode Mode Claimed Output (lm) Claimed Runtime Measured Lumens Tailcap Amps
9 2000 1691 6.80 (and rapidly declining)
8 922 2.40 (and rapidly declining)
7 648 1.34
6 371 0.73
5 214 0.44
4 103 0.20
3 41 0.08
2 5 0.02
1 ~ ~

PWM

Andúril lights (that aren’t the linear drive as the Emisar D4V2  with E21A is) has PWM, we know this.  It’s not bad enough that I notice it though (surprisingly; it’s pretty slow on low!)

You’ll note 9 test modes below (while there are only 7 stepped modes).  Since the ramped low is much lower than the stepped mode’s low, I’ve included it.  The right-most is the “double click turbo.”

For reference, here’s a baseline shot, with all the room lights off and almost nothing hitting the sensor.  And here’s the worst PWM light I have ever owned.  Also one of the very first lights I ordered directly from China!

User Interface and Operation

A single switch controls the SC31 Pro.  This switch is an indicating e-switch, and bigger than is typical on this type light.  It’s also very textured, and quite easy to differentiate from the charge port cover (which is on the opposite side of the head.)

This light ships with Andúril by ToyKeeper.  Andúril is a fantastic UI, and extremely versatile!  The product page even specifies the Andúril version:  2020-03-18.  That’s a pretty good attention to detail!

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight e-switch

The switch has brightness settings, and can also do some “breathing” type feature.  It does seem to be green only, so the Andúril features used to change the switch color don’t do anything here.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight e-switch lighted

First off, here’s the UI chart made by ToyKeeper.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight Andúril ui chart by toykeeper

Here’s my UI table!  This table doesn’t cover the aux and switch leds, but they’re somewhat configurable too.

State Action Result
Off Hold On (Low)
Off Click On (Mode Memory)
Off Click 2x Highest Hybrid Mode
Off Click 3x Blinkie Mode Group
Off Click 4x Lockout
Off Click 5x Momentary
Off Click 6x Muggle
Off Click, Click, Hold Strobe Group (Mode Memory Strobe)
Strobe Group Click 2x Strobe Cycle (Candle > Bike Flasher > Party Strobe > Tactical Strobe > Lightning Storm)
Blinkie Mode Group Click 2x Blinke Cycle (Sunset > Beacon > TempCheck > BattCheck)
On Click 3x Switch between Stepped and Smooth Ramp
On Click 4x Ramp Configuration
TempCheck Click 4x Thermal Configuration
Beacon Click 4x Beacon Configuration
Lockout Click 4x Off
Strobe Group Click Off
(Basically) On Click Off
Candle Click 3x 30 minute timer to off
Strobe Group Hold Heighten selected mode (Make faster or brighter)
Strobe Group Click, Hold Lessen selected mode (Make slower or dimmer)
On Click 2x FET Turbo
Ramp Configuration [Wait for Single flash] Click N time for level N. Selection of the “Low” you like best by clicking 1, 2, 3, etc. where 1, 2, 3, etc are different levels of low.
Ramp Configuration [Wait for Second flash] Click N time for 1+Turbo-N. Selection of the “Ceiling” you like best by clicking 1, 2, 3, etc. where 1, 2, 3, etc are different Ceiling levels.
Ramp Configuration [Wait for Third flash] Click for how many steps you want in Stepped mode. Sets Number of Steps.
Thermal Configuration [Wait for First flash] Click for N times for N degrees C. Displays Current Temperature.
Thermal Configuration [Wait for Second flash] Click for N times for 30C + N. Sets Temperature Limit.
Beacon Configuration [Wait for First flash] Click for N times N seconds per flash Sets Beacon Speed.

LED and Beam

The emitter used here is a Luminus SST-40, and my sample is 6500K temperature.  There’s also a 5000K version, which I recommend you buy unless you hate everything about life.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight emitter

The reflector used is a smooth, moderate depth reflector.

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight emitter on profile

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight emitter on low

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight emitter on headstanding

sofirn sc31 pro Andúril 18650 flashlight emitter on switch on

These beamshots are always with the following settings:  f8, ISO100, 0.3s shutter, and manual 5000K exposure.

I normally test only in stepped mode.  However, the ramped output offers a much lower low, so the first mode below is actually the lowest of the ramped.  Then the next 7 modes are the stepped options, and the rightmost is the [double click to] Turbo.

Tint vs BLF-348 (KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b version) (affiliate link)

Test light is on the left!  As stated above: I normally test only in stepped mode.  However, the ramped output offers a much lower low, so the first mode below is actually the lowest of the ramped.  Then the next 7 modes are the stepped options, and the rightmost is the [double click to] Turbo.

I compare everything to the KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b BLF-348, because it’s inexpensive and has the best tint!

Conclusion

What I like

  • Very low price for solid build quality and Andúril!
  • Versatile lighted side switch
  • 5000K SST-40 option
  • Cell is included
  • Utilizes USB-C charging (and cable is included)

What I don’t like

  • Mine’s 6500K
  • Pocket clip needs to be adjusted

Notes

  • This light was provided by Sofirn for review. I was not paid to write this review.
  • This content originally appeared at zeroair.org.  Please visit there for the best experience!
  • For flashlight related patches, stickers, and gear, head over to PhotonPhreaks, another site where I write!
  • Use my amazon.com referral link if you’re willing to help support making more reviews like this one!
  • Consider making a donation to help support this site and my work!

Author: zeroair

11 thoughts on “Sofirn SC31 Pro Andúril Flashlight Review

  1. That offset green light would bug me, but for the price and Anduril, it might be worth it 🙂

    I saw a review of this light on budgetlightforum, and they noticed a similar fast dropoff on turbo, but after going through the thermal calibration procedure, it both stayed at turbo for longer and stayed at a higher brightness level long-term. It’s possible your light needs the same calibration done on it.

    1. Yes, I did test it at default temperature calibration setup. I should probably calibrate it and run at least one more test. I will probably do that this week.

  2. After reading your lovely review, I felt like I’ve owned this flashlight touché! Appreciate your hard work! Oh yea, may I know what’s the dimension at the area for the pocket clip insertion? I’ve just ordered this flashlight and I thought of getting a separate 2way clip for it.
    Again, great review

    1. I measure this way:

      Clip arms: 6.73mm
      Body diameter at clip: 21.18mm
      Clip arm acceptance height on body: 6.93mm

      Hope that helps!

  3. Great review. The UI table you created is very useful. Very nice photos as well

  4. How do you turn OFF the two small green side switch led’s when flashlight if off?

    1. According to the Anduril docs, 7 clicks starting from the “off” state will cycle you to the next aux led mode. The usual modes are off -> low -> high -> blink -> off, so if it defaults to “low”, you’ll have to do three sets of 7 clicks to get to the “off” mode.

  5. You strongly recommend the 5000k version over the 6500k, is there such big difference and what could that be?

    I’m very very new to the flashlight business and wanted to makre sure I grab the better out of the two 😛

    1. I would say there’s a big difference between 5000K and 6500K, yes. 5000K will be much more toward the “neutral white” side of things, and 6500K will appear much more cool white.

      Total output of the 6500K will probably be greater. If simple output is your goal, you’ll likely get more lumens out of a 6500K temperature than the 5000K, all other things being equal. But the difference is almost certainly not going to be perceptible.

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