Nextorch Saint Torch 30 V2.0 Flashlight Review

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 Flashlight Review

Nextorch released the Saint Torch 30m, a flashlight offering three Cree XHP50.2 emitters. It also has USB-C charging and is a powerbank, too!


Official Specs and Features

Here’s a link to the Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight product page.

Versions

I’m not actually sure what version one of this light is, but V2.0 of the Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight has only one version. There are no body colors or emitter options on this light.

Price

The MSRP for the Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight is $279.


Short Review

This light has a nice feature set at the list price. And wait til you see the runtimes! I love the unusual design of the head, and I have to say that this design seems to manage the heat very well. Charging by USB-C requires USB-A power, but can charge at up to 12V. So that’s a loss and a win both – 12V charging at ~2A is fast, but you might not already have a QC3.0 USB-A plug that can supply it. I would rather the C port also support C to C charging. But I’ll take all of that as a compromise for the great flat output on all the modes (that aren’t Turbo).  Very solid.

Long Review

The Big Table

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 V2.0 Flashlight and Powerbank
Emitter: Cree XHP50.2 (Triple)
Price in USD at publication time: $279.00
Cell: Internal
Turbo Runtime Graph High Runtime Graph
LVP?
Switch Type: Mechanical
On-Board Charging? Yes
Charge Port Type: USB-C
Charge Graph
Power off Charge Port No
Claimed Lumens (lm) 8000
Measured Lumens (at 30s) 8738 (109.2% of claim)^
Candela per Lumen 11.2
Claimed Throw (m) 530
Candela (Calculated) in cd (at 30s) 2550lux @ 5.912m = 89127cd
Throw (Calculated) (m) 597.1 (112.7% of claim)^
Claimed CCT
Measured CCT Range (K) 5400-6700 Kelvin
Item provided for review by: Nextorch
All my Nextorch reviews!

 

^ Measurement disclaimer:  I am an amateur flashlight reviewer.  I don’t have $10,000 or even $1,000 worth of testing equipment.  I test output and such in PVC tubes!!  Please consider claims within 10% of what I measure to be perfectly reasonable (accurate, even).

What’s Included

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight what's included

  • Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight
  • Battery (built in)
  • Wall wart (for outside of the US)
  • Charging cable (USB to USB-C)
  • Shoulder strap
  • Carrying bag
  • Manual

Package and Manual

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight manual

Build Quality and Disassembly

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight

I have said this about the other two Nextorch lights I’ve reviewed (the TA30 and P82), and it’s true about this light too – Nextorch lights are well built! This is a solid flashlight.

The Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight has a massive set of features, too. Couple all that with the interesting head design, and you have my attention.

The light doesn’t really come apart too much though – just the cell tube comes off the head. I wasn’t able to unscrew that tailcap but I have a feeling it’ll unscrew with an appropriate amount of motivation.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight showing threads and head contacts

The contact points are a bit unusual here, too. The head has the normal contacts, but the center is a brass button that goes into the positive contact on the battery. Not a big deal – it all works the same way, but this probably provides a very positive contact.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight battery contacts

On the head are these fingers that grip over the whole head. That head has many cooling fins, and this all seems to deal with heat very well.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight head cooling fins

The handle is the battery – the whole part that detaches is the battery. Knurling on this part is good. Not aggressive but grippy enough. The anodizing is matte, which adds a bit of grip, too.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight battery/body knurling

The tailcap is fairly simple.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight tailcap

Nextorch provides (along with the rest of the very comprehensive package) these two screwed-together parts. They seem to be for use while the head and battery are separated. That is, if you’re using the light as a powerbank or charging the battery, you’d probably want to screw in these parts to protect all the contacts and threads. I’m not sure it’s necessary, but it’s comprehensive!

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight spare parts and parts separated

When these parts are installed, the threads and contacts are well protected. I would guess they confer the same level of waterproofness that the flashlight has in general, when set up as a flashlight.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight storage parts attached Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight storage mode

Size and Comps

Officially 200mm x 84mm x 50mm, and 743g with battery.

If the flashlight will headstand, I’ll show it here (usually the third photo).  If the flashlight will tailstand, I’ll show that here, too (usually the fourth photo).

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight in hand

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight in hand

Here’s the test light with the venerable Convoy S2+.  Mine’s a custom “baked” edition Nichia 219b triple.  A very nice 18650 light.

And here’s the light beside my custom engraved TorchLAB BOSS 35, an 18350 light.  I reviewed the aluminum version of that light in both 35 and 70 formats.

Retention and Carry

Probably the main means of carry on the Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight is the included shoulder strap. That strap attaches here on the head through this split ring. The split ring comes attached but could be removed easily.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight carry strap ring

The other end of the shoulder strap connects through the tailcap.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight shoulder strap

Nextorch also includes as part of the package, this MOLLE-covered nylon carrying case. This is an interesting case. It’s built to carry more than just the Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight specifically, so if you want to use it as a bit of a bug out or EDC bag, it should suffice.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight carry bag with MOLLE Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight carry bag with MOLLE

The light does take up most of the space, but you could easily fit a sandwich or Capri Sun in here.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight carry bag inside

For those parts that are accessories to the light, there’s a “hidden” compartment. Much like many photography bags, this compartment is separated by a velcro closure.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight carry bag "hidden compartment"

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight carry bag "hidden compartment"

There’s no velcro exposed on the outside for morale patches, but with the right setup, you can make it work. 😉

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight carry bag but no velcro spot

Power and Runtime

Nextorch uses a built-in battery for the Saint Torch 30. This battery is built into the handle, and as far as I can tell, can’t really be modified by the user.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight built in battery handle

Since the battery is also a powerbank, there’s a switch to select between options. I am not sure why this is necessary, but I suspect it’s a safety feature – this means the battery contacts aren’t active when the powerbank feature is enacted. So no shorts. It also of course means that you can’t use any of the features concurrently.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight built in battery handle contact points

Below are a few runtime graphs. Turbo does step down quite dramatically but not in a “let’s game the system” way – it holds well over 8000 lumens (the claim) for more than a minute.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight runtime graph

On High, the output is just remarkably flat. This might be the highest “high” but still, at 2600 lumens, and for nearly 2 hours, this is very good!

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight runtime graph

Medium is unsurprisingly flat, too.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight runtime graph

When the light is on, the four indicating LEDs (which you will see below) light briefly to indicate the charge level.  I don’t think the manual covers what they mean but I’d describe it as very obvious. The more blue circles, the higher the charge.

Charging

Charging is by way of this USB-C charging port. This port is exposed only when the battery tube/handle is removed (or “nearly removed” – you don’t really have to unscrew the parts completely).

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight usb-c charging port

Despite being USB-C, C to C charging does not work. Nextorch provides a USB-A to USB-C cable, and that’s what you’ll need to use.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight usb-c charging cable

Nextorch also provides a wall wart, but it’s not suitable for use in the USA – it’s the wrong kind of plug. However, any QC3.0 USB port should provide satisfactory power, and those aren’t difficult to come by. (Alternately, any regular USB port should work, but it’ll be slow.)

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight wall wart Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight wall wart

With 12V power (though not from the device above), charging is quite brisk. Twelve volts at around 1.5A is 18W, and does charge the battery pack in around 2 hours and 41 minutes (consistently.)

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight charging graph

Powerbank

Another feature is the aforementioned powerbank feature, which is facilitated by switching that little three-way toggle to the “USB” option seen below. When in this state (and only when in this state) there’s a little blue LED to indicate.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight powerbank switch

I appreciate that there’s an “OFF” state to this switch too – presumably, this can prevent parasitic drain (but I’m not sure how to test and confirm that.)

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight usb-a port for powerbank

The powerbank works extremely well, outputting well over 2A (and 2A is the claim). At some output level (around 3.3A), the voltage drops out of USB specification. However, the powerbank will output over 2A for the duration of its ability to do so – there’s no sag in voltage or current until the cells are depleted. At the cutoff point seen below, the cells were at the same voltage observed from completed runtime tests: 1.26V.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight powerbank output

Here’s a better view of the first couple of minutes, which is a sort of a stress test on the output levels and voltages.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight powerbank output

Modes and Currents

Mode Mode Claimed Output (lm) Claimed Runtime Measured Lumens Tailcap Amps
Turbo 8000 2h15m initial: 9179
30s: 8738
6.04
High 2400 4h 2642 1.18
Medium 720 7h30m 754 0.30
Low 90 60h 0.03

Pulse Width Modulation

The Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight doesn’t use PWM for any of the four steady modes.

For reference, here’s a baseline shot, with all the room lights off and almost nothing hitting the sensor.  Also, here’s the light with the worst PWM I could find.  I’m adding multiple timescales, so it’ll be easier to compare to the test light.  Unfortunately, the PWM on this light is so bad that it doesn’t even work with my normal scale, with is 50 microseconds (50us).  10ms5ms2ms1ms0.5ms0.2ms.  In a display faster than 0.2ms or so, the on/off cycle is more than one screen, so it’d just (very incorrectly) look like a flat line.  I wrote more about this Ultrafire WF-602C flashlight and explained a little about PWM too.

User Interface and Operation

Nextorch uses a side switch on the Saint Torch 30 flashlight. I am calling this a mechanical clicky, but I am not sure how to confirm that. I say it’s mechanical for two reasons. First, the light comes back on after the battery is disconnected and then reconnected. Secondly, it feels mechanical. If it is mechanical, it’s a reverse clicky. If it’s an e-switch (which is possible, sure), it has the action of a reverse clicky.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight user interface switch

We don’t see side mechanical switch light often, but they do exist.

The switch action is ok – it’s quite deep, and you’ll need to be somewhat deliberate to turn the light on. But once the light is on, switching modes requires a much shallower press and is quite pleasant. One thing to note is that the mode order is higher to lower! The light always turns on into Turbo.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight indicator leds beside switch

Here’s a UI table!

State Action Result
Off Tap Momentary Turbo
Off Click Turbo
On Tap Mode advance (Turbo> High> Medium> Low> Strobe)
On Click Off

And I believe that’s it for the user interface. I don’t think there are really any hidden features or things you’ll have to watch out for. Strobe is in the main group, but it’s quite avoidable since the light always starts on Turbo. I’m not sure that’s the best of both worlds there (since I don’t consider “starting on Turbo” to be that great) but at least you can avoid Strobe if you turn the light off and then back on.

LED and Beam

In the Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight are three Cree XHP50.2 emitters. I don’t see that Nextorch makes a claim on the CCT and CRI of these, but we can check on that later. This is a ‘triple’ but not a traditional triple – each emitter has its own reflector.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight triple emitters

The reflectors are smooth and deep.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight smooth reflectors Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight on

The fingers around the head do allow light to escape when the light headstands.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight headstanding

You can see it here but much more below – the beam has a very distinct hotspot.

Nextorch Saint Torch 30 flashlight on

LED Color Report (CRI and CCT)

Again, the light starts on Turbo and the mode order decreases in output from there. So that’s the mode order you’ll see in all the photos below. On Turbo (left most below), the output does get up into the cooler CCT. The lower modes are quite reasonable though, in the upper 5000K’s.  CRI isn’t great, in the mid to upper 70 range. All in all this isn’t too bad, particularly for a light with such high output levels.

Beamshots

These beamshots are always with the following settings:  f8, ISO100, 0.3s shutter, and manual 5000K exposure.

Tint vs BLF-348 (KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b version) (affiliate link)

I keep the test flashlight on the left, and the BLF-348 reference flashlight on the right.

I compare everything to the KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b BLF-348 because it’s inexpensive and has the best tint!

Conclusion

What I like

  • Love the beam profile
  • Powerbank feature works well
  • Charging from QC3 is very quick
  • Output is very great! Above specification on Turbo
  • High output level is very stable for the duration
  • Nice package including a carry bag
  • Very flashlighty! Has a great ‘wieldability’
  • Battery contacts are not active when the light is in powerbank mode

What I don’t like

  • Doesn’t charge C to C
  • Mode order is highest to lowest
  • Strobe is in the main group (but avoidable, if you pay attention)
  • Unclear if replacement batteries can be purchased
  • Batteries are built-in and not user serviceable

Notes

  • This content originally appeared at zeroair.org.  Please visit there for the best experience!
  • For flashlight-related patches, stickers, and gear, head over to PhotonPhreaks.com!
  • Use my amazon.com referral link if you’re willing to help support making more reviews like this one!
  • Please support me on Patreon!  Feeding flashlights is expensive!  And funding Fun Fund Friday even more so.  I deeply appreciate your support!
Liked it? Take a second to support zeroair on Patreon!

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: