Nextorch P10 Right Angle Flashlight Review

Nextorch P10 Right Angle Flashlight Review

The Nextorch P10 is a right-angle flashlight with three emitters: white, red, and blue. It runs on a single 18650 and has two switches.


Official Specs and Features

Here’s a link to the Nextorch P10 right-angle flashlight product page.

Versions

Only one version is available.

Price

MSRP for the Nextorch P10 right-angle flashlight looks to be $65.


Short Review

The Nextorch P10 is a solidly-built right-angle flashlight, and the addition of red and blue emitters is an interesting (and fun) combination. I wish they both had steady modes instead of being blinky-only, though. Output from the main (white) emitter is good, but again, I do wish for more than three modes.

Long Review

The Big Table

Nextorch P10 right-angle flashlight
Emitter: Unstated emitter
Price in USD at publication time: $65.00
Cell: 1×18650
Runtime Graphs
LVP? Yes
Switch Type: Both
Quiescent Current (mA):
On-Board Charging? Yes
Charge Port Type: micro-USB (on cell)
Charge Graph
Power off Charge Port
Claimed Lumens (lm) 1400
Measured Lumens (at 30s) 1481 (105.8% of claim)^
Candela per Lumen 7.5
Claimed Throw (m) 200
Candela (Calculated) in cd (at 30s) 447lux @ 5.446m = 13258cd
Throw (Calculated) (m) 230.3 (115.2% of claim)^
Claimed CCT
Measured CCT Range (K) 6200-6400 Kelvin
Item provided for review by: Nextorch
All my Nextorch reviews!

^ Measurement disclaimer:  I am an amateur flashlight reviewer.  I don’t have $10,000 or even $1,000 worth of testing equipment.  I test output and such in PVC tubes!!  Please consider claims within 10% of what I measure to be perfectly reasonable (accurate, even).

What’s Included

Nextorch P10 Right Angle Flashlight what's included

  • Nextorch P10 right-angle flashlight
  • Nextorch 2600mAh 18650
  • Charging cable (USB to micro-USB)
  • Spare o-rings (2)
  • Manual

Package and Manual

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight manual

Build Quality and Disassembly

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight

It’s not a headlamp! The P10 is solidly a “right-angle” flashlight, and no means of using it as a headlamp are included. That’s fine: right-angle lights are awesome!

The back of the head here offers some cooling fins.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight cooling fins

The tailcap has a nice thick spring. 

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight tailcap spring

Inside the cell tube, you can see that the head has a spring, too. 

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight head spring

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight tailcap

Size and Comps

117.2mm x 24mm x 32.1mm, and 91g without the battery.

If the flashlight will headstand, I’ll show it here (usually the third photo).  If the flashlight will tailstand, I’ll also show that (usually in the fourth photo).

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight in hand

Here’s the test light with the venerable Convoy S2+.  Mine’s a custom “baked” edition Nichia 219b triple.  A very nice 18650 light.

Also above is the light beside my custom engraved TorchLAB BOSS 35, an 18350 light.  I reviewed the aluminum version of that light in both 35 and 70 formats.

Retention and Carry

Again, the Nextorch P10 is a right-angle flashlight, not a headlamp. So don’t expect any headband or the like. What you do get is a nice thick friction-fit pocket clip.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight pocket clip

The clip attaches only on the head end. There’s no “deep carry” or reversible carry, but as it is, the light can stick out of your pocket and still be used, if that’s your jam.

There is no magnet or anything else for carry of the P10.

Power and Runtime

Nextorch includes a cell with the P10 right-angle flashlight. The cell is a standard button-top 18650, with a capacity of 2600mAh.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight with 18650

The cell is installed into the P10 in the usual way – positive end (button) toward the head.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight with 18650 installed

In case you forget that the cell tube is also marked with little positive/negative icons.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight cell orientation markers

Below are a couple of runtime tests. Output is quite great for a minute or so in the highest mode (“High”) but steps down dramatically. 

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight runtime graph

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight runtime graph

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight runtime graph

Charging

I said above that this is a “normal” 18650 and that’s true – it’s a standard button top. However, it does offer on-board charging. That’s by way of a micro-USB port in the positive end. I did run a test charging via that micro-USB, which you can see below.

Nextorch E51C rechargeable flashlight micro-USB cell

Nextorch includes a short USB to micro-USB cable.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight charging cable for cell

Here’s the micro-USB charging on the cell. It’s very slow.

Nextorch E51C rechargeable flashlight charging graph

Modes and Currents

Mode Mode Claimed Output (lm) Claimed Runtime Measured Lumens Tailcap Amps
High 1400 3h30m 1481 5.35
Medium 200 6h 194 0.40
Low 25 5h 24 0.06

Pulse Width Modulation

Below, High is first and doesn’t use PWM. The lower two modes do.

For reference, here’s a baseline shot, with all the room lights off and almost nothing hitting the sensor.  Also, here’s the light with the worst PWM I could find.  I’m adding multiple timescales, so it’ll be easier to compare to the test light.  Unfortunately, the PWM on this light is so bad that it doesn’t even work with my normal scale, with is 50 microseconds (50us).  10ms5ms2ms1ms0.5ms0.2ms.  In a display faster than 0.2ms or so, the on/off cycle is more than one screen, so it’d just (very incorrectly) look like a flat line.  I wrote more about this Ultrafire WF-602C flashlight and explained a little about PWM too.

User Interface and Operation

First, let’s talk about the switch right at the top end of the P10. It seems like a mechanical switch (it feels like one, anyway). But it’s very likely a “disguised” e-switch.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight head switch

I say that because it has characteristics of both forward and reverse clicky switches – it’s possible to tap for momentary activation, but also change modes while the light is on.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight head switch profile

The action is quite deep, too. This switch controls only the white LED.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight head switch actuation

The other switch is on the side of the head and is most certainly an e-switch. Since this e-switch will work regardless of the state of the head switch, I hypothesize that both are actually e-switches (otherwise I’m unsure how the side e-switch could receive power with the main switch off).

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight side e-switch

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight side e-switch actuation

Here’s a UI table!

State Action Result
Off Click Top Switch On (White)
Off Tap Top Switch Momentary White
Off Repeated taps on Top Switch Mode advance (HML)^
On (White) Click Top Switch Off
Off Hold Side Switch On (Red/blue modes)
Red/blue modes On Click Side Switch Mode advance (Red Beacon/ Blue Beacon/Red and blue flash)
Red/blue modes on Hold Side Switch Red/blue off^^

^ After one time through the modes of HML, the next mode after High will be Strobe. That’s right, strobe is in the main group (sort of.)
^^ It’s also possible to enter red/blue from a “white on” state. In that case, holding the side switch for “off” of red/blue will turn the light to the previous white state.

The manual states (or “seems to state”) that the secondary emitters (red/blue) can be on in a steady state, but I couldn’t activate it. I could only get the blinky modes out of red and blue.  

LED and Beam

As far as I can see, Nextorch does not state what emitter is used in the P10. Below you can see the setup – white in the middle with red and blue surrounding the white emitter.

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight emitter

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight emitter on

Nextorch P10 right angle flashlight emitter on

Again, I couldn’t get the red and blue emitters to enter a steady state, so I don’t have any photos or testing of those emitters. 

LED Color Report (CRI and CCT)

As above, the order here is high to low. CRI is low at under 70, and CCT ranges from 6200K to 6400K, which is cool white.

Beamshots

These beamshots are always with the following settings:  f8, ISO100, 0.3s shutter, and manual 5000K exposure.

Tint vs BLF-348 (KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b version) (affiliate link)

I keep the test flashlight on the left, and the BLF-348 reference flashlight on the right.

I compare everything to the KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b BLF-348 because it’s inexpensive and has the best tint!

Conclusion

What I like

  • Good build quality
  • Dual switch interface
  • Great output on High (briefly)
  • It’s a dedicated right-angle light (and not a headlamp at all)

What I don’t like

  • Switch for white emitter is too sensitive on first pass – High always ends up on medium, and you have to cycle through the modes to get to high.
  • Red and blue are blinky only! (no steady states)
  • Minor complaint is micro-USB on the cell (and not USB-C). (But I use bay-style chargers anyway, sooo)
  • It’s a dedicated right-angle light (and not a headlamp at all)

Notes

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