in hand

Fenix released the E-Lite, a multipurpose EDC flashlight. This has a main white emitter, with blue and red secondary. Read on for testing!


Official Specs and Features

Here’s a link to the Fenix E-Lite Multipurpose Mini EDC flashlight product page.

Versions

There is just one version.

Price

The Fenix E-Lite Multipurpose Mini EDC flashlight is going for a reasonable $19.95.


Fenix E-Lite Multipurpose Mini EDC Flashlight Short Review

This is a fun little light.  I like it much more than I guess I expected to.  It’s fun to use, the secondary colors are useful, and the main emitter is much more usable like a flashlight than you probably guessed.

Long Review

The Big Table

Fenix E-Lite Multipurpose Mini EDC Flashlight
Emitter: MATCH CA18 (And Red, Blue)
Price in USD at publication time: $19.95
Cell: Internal
High Runtime Graph Medium Runtime Graph
LVP? Switches off
Switch Type: E-Switch
Quiescent Current (mA): ?
On-Board Charging? Yes
Charge Port Type: USB-C
Charge Graph
Power off Charge Port All modes
Claimed Lumens (lm) 150
Measured Lumens (at 30s) 150 (100% of claim)*
Candela per Lumen 4.7
Claimed Throw (m) 40
Candela (Calculated) in cd (at 30s) 85lux @ 2.655m = 599cd
Throw (Calculated) (m) 49.0 (122.5% of claim)*
All my Fenix reviews!
  • Measurement disclaimer:  I am an amateur flashlight reviewer.  I don’t have $10,000 or even $1,000 worth of testing equipment.  I test output and such in PVC tubes!!  Please consider claims within 10% of what I measure to be perfectly reasonable (accurate, even).

What’s Included in the Fenix E-Lite Multipurpose Mini EDC flashlight Package

what's included

  • Fenix E-Lite Multipurpose Mini EDC flashlight
  • Charge cable (USB to USB-C)
  • Manual and paperwork

Package and Manual

packaging

manual

I commented on another post about the consistency of Fenix packages.  Here’s support of that:

Build Quality and Disassembly

The body of the Fenix E-Lite Multipurpose Mini EDC flashlight is entirely plastic.

fenix e-lite

This white pad on the top is a soft (or “supple”) material, much like a diffusor you’ve probably seen very often.

The main emitter, though, is very much like a standard keychain flashlight style.

fenix e-lite main emitter fenix e-litepocket clip side view back view side view

Overall the build quality is good.  This light is IP66 rated, with I guess the weak point being the charge port.  But I find it to be quite secure.

Size and Comps

  • Length: 2.05″
  • Width: 0.91″
  • Depth: 0.79″
  • Weight: 0.63 oz.

If a light will headstand, I’ll show it here (usually the third photo).  If a light will tailstand, I’ll show that here, too (usually the fourth photo).

Here’s the test light with the venerable Convoy S2+.  Mine’s a custom “baked” edition Nichia 219b triple.  A very nice 18650 light.

And here’s the light beside my custom engraved TorchLAB BOSS 35, an 18350 light.  I reviewed the aluminum version of that light in both 35 and 70 format.

beside torchlab boss 35

Retention and Carry

There’s a pocket clip built in to the Fenix E-Lite.  This is not removable

pocket clip

There’s a nice bit of flex with the clip.

pocket clip springy

This little loop here in the pocket clip can also be used for a lanyard or wrist strap.

fenix e-lite pocket clip loop

Power and Runtime

Since I was unable to get the light apart, I am unsure what the battery looks like inside.  In any case here are a couple of runtime tests.  Unfortunately I bumped the light around a couple of times in this test on high…. In reality the output after stepping down would be completely flat.

runtime graph high runtime graph medium

Again, since the light is sealed, I was unable to test post-run voltage.  The light does shut off at the end of the runtimes, though.

Charging

Charging happens via a USB-C port on the end of the body.

An appropriate cable is included – USB to USB-C.

Charging looks quite good at around 0.3A and requiring around an hour and a half.

charge graph

While charging, the light indicates red, but not with the main red emitter.  There’s a secondary emitter for indication.  When charging is complete, a green indicating emitter stays lit.

Modes and Currents

Mode Mode Claimed Output (lm) Claimed Runtime Measured Lumens Tailcap Amps
White – High 150 1h40m 150
White – Medium 45 4h20m 45
White – Low 5 20h
Red 3 22h
Blue 3 22h

Pulse Width Modulation

There is no PWM to be seen on any mode.

For reference, here’s a baseline shot, with all the room lights off and almost nothing hitting the sensor.  And here’s the worst PWM light I have ever owned.  Also one of the very first lights I ordered directly from China!

User Interface and Operation

The Fenix E-Lite is controlled by an e-switch, which is under this supple pad on the top/front.

e-switch

It’s very hard to see and I haven’t photographed it well, but there’s a little divot where you should pressed, and that divot is encircled by a raised ring.  It’s very subtle though, but easy to feel.

Here’s a UI table!

State Action Result
Off Click Battery indicator
Off Hold On – White Low
Off Double Click Lock
Lock Double Click Unlock
On White Click Mode advance (LMH)
On Brief Hold Off
On White Longer Hold Red Steady (switch to secondary group)
Red Steady Click Mode advance (Red Steady > Red Flash > Blue Steady > Blue Flash)

LED and Beam

Fenix opted for a Match CA18 for the E-Lite’s main emitter.  I’ve only seen that in one other light I think, and that’s also a Fenix – the E03R.

emitter

This main emitter has a tiny TIR, and the beam is surprisingly tight and useful.

The secondary emitters – red and blue – aren’t mentioned by brand or model.  In the far right photo, you can see the green indicating LED, too.

main emitter in use red side emitter blue side emitter

 

These beamshots are always with the following settings:  f8, ISO100, 0.3s shutter, and manual 5000K exposure.

Tint vs BLF-348 (KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b version) (affiliate link)

Test light is on the left!

I compare everything to the KillzoneFlashlights.com 219b BLF-348, because it’s inexpensive and has the best tint!

Conclusion

What I like

  • Great for belt or backpack use
  • Easy User Interface
  • Actually useful main emitter
  • USB-C Charging
  • Low cost

What I don’t like

  • Lack of replaceable battery
  • No very low mode
  • All plastic build

Notes

  • This light was provided by Fenix-Store for review. I was not paid to write this review.
  • This content originally appeared at zeroair.org.  Please visit there for the best experience!
  • For flashlight related patches, stickers, and gear, head over to PhotonPhreaks, another site where I write!
  • Use my amazon.com referral link if you’re willing to help support making more reviews like this one!

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